Difference between revisions of "Marsha van Dalen"

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I am currently studying Al-Sc alloys.  These alloys form nanosize Al3Sc precipitates. Currently, I am adding several rare earth elements as ternary additions with the hope of improving the creep properties and making the microstructure more stable.  The small size scale of the precipitates requires the use of a specific set of tools to study the microstructure. One of the main tools I use is the three dimensional atom probe (3DAP) microscope.  This instrument gives near atomic resolution which allows us to see the position of individual atoms within the material. I also use transmission electron microscopy to study the microstructure. Mechanical testing of the alloys is also important. The main property under investigation is the creep resistance of the alloys.
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I am currently studying Al-Sc alloys.  These alloys form nanosize Al3Sc precipitates. Currently, I am adding several rare earth elements as ternary additions with the hope of improving the creep properties and making the microstructure more stable.  The small size scale of the precipitates requires the use of a specific set of tools to study the microstructure. One of the main tools I use is the Atom-Probe Tomograph (APT).  This instrument gives near atomic resolution which allows us to see the position of individual atoms within the material. I also use transmission electron microscopy to study the microstructure. Mechanical testing of the alloys is also important. The main property under investigation is the creep resistance of the alloys.
  
 
Although originally from the Netherlands, I grew up in Tucson, Arizona. I graduated from Princeton University in 2002 with a bachelors degree in mechanical engineering. I then switched to materials science and I am now in my third year of graduate school in the Materials Science Department here at Northwestern University. I am co-advised by David Dunand and David Seidman, who are both in the Materials Science Department.
 
Although originally from the Netherlands, I grew up in Tucson, Arizona. I graduated from Princeton University in 2002 with a bachelors degree in mechanical engineering. I then switched to materials science and I am now in my third year of graduate school in the Materials Science Department here at Northwestern University. I am co-advised by David Dunand and David Seidman, who are both in the Materials Science Department.
 
[[Category:People|Dalen, Marsha van]]
 
[[Category:People|Dalen, Marsha van]]

Revision as of 03:50, 2 November 2005

Marsha van Dalen
Marsha van Dalen at the 3DAP
Research:
Education:
Publications: Dalen Publications by van Dalen in our database

Contact

Marsha van Dalen
Materials Science and Engineering
2220 North Campus Drive
Evanston, IL 60208
Phone: 847.491.5936
Email:
Fax: 847.467.2269

I am currently studying Al-Sc alloys. These alloys form nanosize Al3Sc precipitates. Currently, I am adding several rare earth elements as ternary additions with the hope of improving the creep properties and making the microstructure more stable. The small size scale of the precipitates requires the use of a specific set of tools to study the microstructure. One of the main tools I use is the Atom-Probe Tomograph (APT). This instrument gives near atomic resolution which allows us to see the position of individual atoms within the material. I also use transmission electron microscopy to study the microstructure. Mechanical testing of the alloys is also important. The main property under investigation is the creep resistance of the alloys.

Although originally from the Netherlands, I grew up in Tucson, Arizona. I graduated from Princeton University in 2002 with a bachelors degree in mechanical engineering. I then switched to materials science and I am now in my third year of graduate school in the Materials Science Department here at Northwestern University. I am co-advised by David Dunand and David Seidman, who are both in the Materials Science Department.